Matchmaking for Beginners – Book Review

By: Maddie Dawson

Matchmaking for Beginners by Maddie Dawson is a fun spin on the traditional romance novel. It includes magic, witchery and elements of serendipity. Dawson creates interesting characters that provide enjoyable additions to the story’s main plot.  One of the main characters, Aunt Blix, feels she has a special gift that helps her see and touch people’s emotions.  She believes in some forms of witchcraft, mainly focusing her craft on assisting others in finding love.  She has an unconventional view on life, love and death. 

“…it’s in the broken places where the light gets in.”

Marnie, the other main character in this story, seems completely different from Blix.  Marnie fantasizes about her future life as a wife and mother.  Despite this, when Blix meets Marnie for the first time, she feels instantly connected to her, like they are kindred spirits. These two women meet at Blix’s niece’s home when Marnie is introduced to Blix’s family.  Marnie is engaged to Blix’s grandnephew Noah.   This meeting will shape the final moments of Blix’s life and Marnie’s entire future. 

As the book continues, Marnie’s life takes an unexpected turn leaving her alone and single again.  She eventually tries to pick up the pieces of her life with a new man she thinks she loves.  I could see that this new love interest brought Marnie the comfort she so desperately needed after her heartbreak.  However, it became increasingly apparent that she wasn’t in love with this man, and she was just hoping to find herself back on track with the life she had always dreamed of.  However, in the back of Marnie’s mind she keeps remembering Blix’s inspiring words.   Blix wanted a different life for Marnie, and you can see Marnie struggling to understand which life she truly wants.   Blix, from afar, never stops thinking about Marnie.  Blix tries to influence Marnie to choose bigger and more exciting paths in life. 

“I think she’s kind of enjoying being furious with her ex for now, if you want to know the truth. It’s hard to make room for love when anger still feels so good.”

This story includes love, loss, happiness and humour.  Although Marnie wasn’t the most exciting character, you can’t help but feel connected to her.  Some of the situations she found herself in, especially with Jeremy, were a bit frustrating, but I can understand her desperate need to heal her heart.  Blix brought humour and excitement into this story, and when she passes, I felt like her presence was desperately missed.  I really enjoyed learning about the other characters in Blix’s life.  Her neighbours were all exciting people, and seeing how their lives were affected by love added a layer of intrigue to the story.  I was not fond of the negative connotations implied towards a more conventional life; everyone should choose the path that makes them the happiest.  I can’t say this is my favourite book of all time, but it was definitely a fun read.  I have already purchased Maddie Dawson’s sequel to this book, A Happy Catastrophe.

“My own heart, given away to Noah, now stirs somewhere deep down, stretches, yawns, looks at its watch and rolls over, tries to go back to sleep. But it has one eye open, I notice.”

Have you read any of Maddie Dawson’s work?


Float Plan- Book Review

By: Trish Doller

Float Plan by Trish Doller was a deeper story than I originally anticipated.  The main character, Anna, loses her fiancé, Ben, to suicide.  It was shocking to read and heartbreaking for both Anna and Ben.  Due to this topic’s seriousness, Doller includes a warning at the beginning of her book letting her readers know that suicide will be a focal point in this story. 

“…but kind is one of the easiest things to be.”

We are introduced to Anna months after her fiancé has died.  Since his passing, her life has been tough; she has really struggled to find her footing without Ben.

Before Ben died, he bought a sailboat and planned a sailing trip around the Caribbean.  Ben and Anna were going to embark on this trip together and get married on one of the islands they planned on visiting.   Even though Ben is no longer alive, Anna makes a last-minute decision to go on this sailing trip alone.  She feels this trip will help her cope with Ben’s loss while also keeping him close to her heart.  Anna plans to follow the exact route laid out by Ben, stopping at every island he dreamed of visiting.   With little knowledge in sailing, she departs off Florida’s coast, heading towards her first stop, Bimini.

Her first couple of days of sailing pose many difficulties, and she quickly realizes she cannot continue this trip alone.  She needs to find someone with more experience to take this journey with her.  Therefore she decides to put out an ad for an experienced sailor.  This is when we meet Keane, an enthusiastic sailor originally from Ireland.  He agrees to the terms laid out by Anna, and they begin their voyage, following Ben’s map.

They visit so many incredible places along the way.  I researched some of the destinations they mentioned and was immediately struck by the beauty of each spot. Doller’s vivid detail describing these islands makes the reader want to drop everything and visit these beautiful locations.

“Carla once told me the best way to make a decision is to flip a coin. She said that when the coin is in the air, you’ll usually figure our what you truly want.”

Float Plan is a heartbreaking story of grief and loss.  It was difficult reading about Anna’s inner struggle to enjoy her surroundings without Ben by her side.  She felt guilty enjoying herself, always feeling like Ben should be the there happily sailing across the Caribbean.   Anna initially embarked on this sailing adventure to get closer to Ben but, as time progressed, she found herself becoming more independent and empowered by all the challenges she was overcoming.  She met many incredible people along the way that helped her accept her grief while also teaching her to enjoy life again.  Although I found the book a bit slow and it never really captivated my attention, I still appreciate the importance of reading this story. 

“Eventually – and I say this from experience – you’ll start building a new house beside the ruins of the old. When you’re ready, you’ll know.”


A Spanish Love Deception – Book Review

By Elena Armas

A Spanish Love Deception by Elena Armas is your typical enemies turn lovers romance novel. It was also very funny; therefore, I would categorize it as a rom-com as well.  The main characters, Catalina and Aaron, are both engineers who work at the same company in New York City.  They do not have a friendly relationship until Aaron offers Catalina his help with a work event and with her family.  Catalina is desperate for help and, despite her worries, decides to take Aaron up on his offer.  As they spend more time together, Catalina begins to see Aaron differently.

What I loved…

I don’t think I have ever loved a main character as much as I loved Catalina. She was intelligent, funny, intense and exciting. The way she interacts with other people and the way she starts babbling in awkward situations was hysterical. The thoughts that went through her head are even more entertaining than the things she ends up saying out loud.  Throughout the book, we see her begin to understand her true worth by accepting her shortcomings, acknowledging her successes and loving herself. 

We are introduced to even more hilarious characters when meeting Catalina’s family in Spain. Her family was loud, intense and funny. I could have read a whole book just on Catalina and her family. All the chapters involving the Spain trip I read in one sitting, it was just too funny, I couldn’t put the book down!

The love story between Catalina and Aaron was predictable, but I still really enjoyed it. They are pretty different, so reading about their interactions at work and their slow progression to falling for one another was amusing. However, I feel that they fell “in love” a bit too quickly, but it made for a good story.

I also liked how Armas included some real-world connections to this story. She wrote of the difficulties a successful female engineer would have in a predominantly male industry. Catalina’s career obstacles would have been different from Aaron’s or any of the other male engineers. The sexist comments she receives from one of the male co-workers show the difficulties that some women may face in their work environment. I think the inclusion of these subplots added some realness to this story that I thought was important.

Minor things I didn’t like…

The book was way too long. The beginning sections that showed the hatred Aaron and Catalina had for one another lasted forever.  I found myself skimming through some of these initial interactions.  I would have preferred the beginning section to be shorter and the parts where they’re in Spain to have been longer. There was so much build-up to their trip to Spain, and then I felt like the Spain trip came and went too quickly!

Final remarks…

In the end, despite its length, I could not put this book down. I enjoyed reading it, and I was sad when it ended.  I would highly recommend reading this book.

Where to find the Author…

https://www.authorelenaarmas.com/


With Warm Weather Comes Bright Books! My Spring Reading List

It is the first week of Spring, and I am so excited! I absolutely love this time of year. Snow is melting (even though Switzerland barely gets snow apparently), flowers and trees are blooming, and the temperature rises. The winter is behind us, and the day is getting longer! All I want to do is be outside enjoying this beautiful weather. With this excitement, I thought it was only fitting to create a list of the books I want to read to keep me in my happy spring mood. Here is the list I came up with:

The Spanish Love Deception By: Elena Armas

Armas has an absolutely beautiful bookstagram page that features all the books she has read and loved. She mostly reads romance novels and is a self-proclaimed hopeless romantic. Some books she has recommended have become my absolute favourites. Therefore, when she completed her first romance novel in early 2021, I knew I had to get my hands on it. The reviews on this book have been great; I can’t wait to get started! 

Dominicana By: Angie Cruz 

This book is set in multiple seasons; it follows a woman from the Dominican who moves to New York City. However, much of the book’s beginning is set in the Dominican Republic’s countryside (which satisfies my need for a warm setting). The main character has always dreamed of a better life in America, and when the opportunity arises, it’s not exactly as she pictured it. This is a more serious book than the rest on this list, but I am really intrigued by the storyline. As well, in 2020, this book was shortlisted for the Women’s Prize for Fiction and has received many other numerous awards. The reviews for this book are incredible.

Float Plan By: Trish Doller

This book is set in the summertime on a sailboat, so I am already hooked! The plot centers around a woman who has just experienced deep grief and is now supposed to be going on a previously booked sailing trip; realizing she can’t make the trip alone, she hires a professional sailer to come on the trip with her. This book is exactly the kind of book that will excite me for the summer months ahead.  

Matchmaking for Beginners By: Maddie Dawson 

This book was written a few years ago and was (and is) very popular. It has been on my TBR list for quite a while, so I thought it was time to take it off the shelf and finally give it a read.  

What is on your spring reading list?


What Alice Forgot – Book Review

By: Liane Moriarty

“That was the day Alice Mary Love went to the gym and carelessly misplaced a decade of her life.” 

Book Summary:

What Alice Forgot by Liane Moriarty starts with the main character, Alice Love, waking up after hitting her head and becoming unconscious.  Due to this fall, Alice has forgotten the last 10 years of her life.   She wakes up believing she is 29, happily married and pregnant with her first child.  However, she is actually 39, separated from her husband and a mother of three. 

Alice spends a couple of days in the hospital as doctors try to understand why she has lost her memory.  While Alice is there, she tries to piece together the last ten years of her life and the relationships with friends and family that have grown or fizzled out. When she returns home, she still doesn’t recognize her fully renovated home or her three children.  She also longs for her husband to come home and be with her, despite the constant reminders that they are separated.  As she explores her new life, she comes across familiar scents or locations that would trigger parts of her memory.  These moments were often short and broken up, making it very hard for Alice to make sense of what she saw or felt.   This continues for Alice for a week as she tries to grapple with her failed marriage and her three unknown children. 

After a week, there is a Mother’s day brunch event that Alice is running at her children’s school.  It is here where things all come together, and after a brief fainting episode, Alice awakens with her memory back. 

Once she has gotten her memory back, she grapples with the life she now remembers and the life she hoped for herself as a young soon-to-be mother.  How she decides to merge these two lives forms the ending of this book.

“But maybe every life looked wonderful if all you saw was the photo albums.”

My Review:

What Alice Forgot was incredibly thought-provoking and emotional.  It brings into focus the complexities of marriage and raising children.  It also reminds the reader not to lose who they are and what they stand for as they get older. Alice could hardly recognize who she was at 39 and that saddened her. It had me wondering what I envisioned of my life when I was 20 and how happy I would be with the person I have become today. 

“I’d be at work where people respected my opinions, said Nick. And then, I’d come home, and it was like I was the village idiot.”

This story totally consumed me; I wanted to know what would happen with her marriage, her relationship with her sister and the new friendships she formed within the last 10 years of her life.  Despite this story’s seriousness, Moriarty also includes some humor, especially with 29-year-old Alice navigating life with three young children.  These interactions were hilarious.  I also really liked the way this story ended; it perfectly concluded the story of Alice Love.

“The medication, the hormones and the relentless frustrations of our lives make us bitchy, and you’re not allowed to be bitchy in public, or people won’t like you.”

I do, however, have one small criticism of the book.  I found some parts of this story were a bit redundant.  I think Elizabeth’s story adds a layer of seriousness and complexity to the story that is definitely important.  However, I found her journal entries felt repeated and too detailed.  Sometimes I found myself skimming over those sections because I knew what the premise was, and the lengthy details weren’t necessary.  Moriarty also includes love letters by Alice’s grandmother, Frannie.  I enjoyed these letters, but I still found them to be more of a distraction from the main story. 

Overall, this was an excellent read, and I will definitely be reading more of Liane Moriarty’s books in the future.

More books by Liane Moriarty:

*Big Little Lies (This book was made into an HBO series)

*The Husband’s Secret

*Truly Madly Guilty


My COVID Lockdown Booklist

As a new year begins, the hopes of a new beginning away from COVID are slowly diminishing. In Switzerland, where I live, we enter into our 3rd week of lockdown, with three more weeks to go. One way I plan on passing the time is by reading some of the unopened books I still have on my shelf. I decided to make a list of all the books I want to read during this time. I’m hoping it will give me something to look forward to each week and help get me through this lockdown!

The Beekeeper of Aleppo by: Christy Lefteri

This book caught my attention because of its connection to current events, specifically the refugee crisis in the Middle East and Europe. Over the last couple of years, we have been watching heartbreaking scenes of refugees fleeing war-torn Syria for Europe. This book tries to put a face to this crisis by writing about a fictional Syrian family and their refugee story. The family decides to leave Syria after the war has already begun; they embark on a dangerous journey to freedom, trekking through many of the same escape routes Syrian families are all too familiar with. I’m sure this will be a very captivating story and shed light on the struggles refugees worldwide experience.

What Alice Forgot by: Liane Moriarty

Many friends and family have continuously recommended this book, so I have finally decided to add it to my list. This story is about the effects of memory loss and piecing together a life that is unrecognizable. It is slightly different from the type of books I usually read, but lockdown is a great time to explore some new genres!

The Tattooist of Auschwitz by: Heather Morris

This book has been on my book list for many years, but every time I think about opening it, I wonder if I am truly ready for the emotional roller coaster I know this book will embark on. However, recently I read another book by Heather Morris, called Cilka’s Journey, and I loved it. It was definitely emotionally tormenting but, I am very glad I read it. So I decided I needed to give The Tattooist of Auschwitz a read.

A Promised Land by: Barack Obama

I haven’t read a biography in a long time, and I find myself craving to read one. Since American politics has been a focal point in world news recently, I found it only fitting to add A Promised Land by Barack Obama to my book list. Whether you agree with his politics or not, you cannot argue his presidency’s historical significance and wonder how he got there.

What does your lockdown booklist look like?


The Happy Ever After Playlist- Book Review

Author: Abby Jimenez

“You can’t control the bad things that happen to you. All you can do is decide how much of you you’re going to let them take.”

I want to start by saying that The Happy Ever After Playlist, by Abby Jimenez, is actually the second book of a series.  However, I didn’t know this when I started reading it; I only realized it after I had finished the book.  The Friend Zone is the first book in the series but, The Happy Ever After Playlist can definitely stand alone.  Zero knowledge of The Friend Zone is needed to read this story.

I picked this book up from the bookstore because I felt it was time to read a lighthearted, fun, romantic book that would make me smile.  This book did just that.  My last few books had been pretty dramatic, serious and emotional, so this was a welcomed break. 

What is this book about?

The main character, Sloan Monroe, is trying to pick up the pieces of her life after her fiance suddenly died in a motorcycle accident two years ago.  The first book gives the excruciating details of the accident and the hospital scene; in this book, you are left to imagine how terrible this experience would have been for Sloan.  I, for one, am very glad I didn’t have to read about those details.  This story is focused more on how Sloan will help herself move on from this loss and bring happiness back into her life.

One day as Sloan was driving and stopped at a stoplight, a dog (which we later find out is named Tucker) ran into her car, causing quite a big scene.  Once Sloan pulled off the road with this dog, she tried to look for the owner but couldn’t find anyone that knew the dog.  She decided to bring the dog home and care for it until she could locate the owner.  Little did she know this encounter would change her life.  Tucker brought so much energy into Sloan’s life, and you begin to see Sloan coming out of her depressed shell while trying to care for this dog.  Eventually, we find out the dog owner is a man named Jason, who is currently in Australia for work.  Sloan and Jason begin speaking over the phone, at first only concerning Tucker, but gradually, they find themselves more interested in learning about one another.  Jason is the first man that Sloan finds herself crushing on since she lost her fiancé.  This is how their romance begins.   The beginning of their relationship is exciting and playful, everything a new relationship should be.  Eventually, as they start to fall more into one another, their relationship becomes a serious love affair filled with dramatic ups and downs, especially once Sloan realizes that Jason is an up and coming musician.

My thoughts on the book…

This is an enjoyable, lighthearted romance novel.  You know the characters will fall for one another right from the beginning, but the turns and twists it takes along the way are pretty surprising.  I also really loved Sloan’s character; I was always rooting for her.  I truly wanted her to find happiness, whether it was with Jason or in her own life.  I think the character development of Sloan was the best part of this story.  You watch her struggle in the beginning to find a way to move on with her life after her sudden heartbreak, then slowly see her trying to put happiness back into her life.  I liked that even though Jason had a big part in helping her move on from her loss, Sloan individually worked on how she could better herself and move on from her tragic experiences.  When she finally gets back into the hobbies she loves, it is genuinely heartwarming. She began as a fractured love hurt young women and grew into an independent artist who woke up every day prioritizing her happiness. 

Jason’s character I fell in love with right from the beginning, I think most women would.  He was incredibly charming, flirtatious, kind and caring.  He knew what Sloan had gone through and approached it perfectly.  He always put her happiness at the forefront of his life, which is something every woman deserves.  His character definitely hit many women’s fantasies of falling in love with a beautiful famous singer.

This book was a very enjoyable read; I especially loved the ending.  This is a perfect book to lift your spirits and make you feel so warm inside. The songs Jimenez included before each chapter really represented the feelings you experience when reading that chapter, and I thought that was a unique twist to this romance novel.   Whenever I would read this book throughout my day, I was instantly in a better mood and really, what more could you want from a book?

A little bit about the author…

Abby Jimenez is the author of The Friend Zone and The Happy Ever After Playlist. Jimenez is also a famous baker who has won many Food Network Competitions. She first showed off her literary skills through comments on her baking page: Nadia Cakes. She has a new book coming out in spring 2021 called Life’s Too Short.


The Age of Light – Book Review

This book is an interesting work of fiction because its main characters are based on real people. Parts of their lives have been put together by the author, Whitney Scharer’s, imagination. I didn’t know this until I had completed the book and began to do some research into the author. I’m not sure how I feel about the idea of reimagining peoples lives but, many of Scharer’s readers seemed to like it.

A little bit about the book…

The book begins in 1966 in England with the main character, Lee Miller and her husband Roland, living in the countryside. At the time, Miller is writing cooking pieces for Vogue. She writes about her cooking methods and photographs each step of her cooking process. This is where it becomes evident that Lee Miller is a skilled photographer. Miller is very unhappy in her current life, and you even begin to wonder, because of her attitude and drinking, if she has always been unhappy.

As the first part of the book continues, we are introduced to many new characters, including her editor at Vogue, Audrey Withers. Withers asks Miller to write a new piece focusing on her time in Paris working with the famous photographer, Man Ray. Immediately Miller refuses but quickly realizes that she doesn’t have much choice if she wants to continue working for Vogue. Miller lists some stipulations for the piece and then accepts.

It is at this point that Miller began her story, beginning in Paris 1929. She moves to Paris to begin her photography career and eventually meets and falls in love with Man Ray. This romance is a whirlwind from the very beginning. Man Ray was much older than Lee Miller, which isn’t surprising once you understand the relationship Miller has with her father. She begins her career as Man Ray’s assistant, learning from his photography skills. However, as their romance begins and she continues to be Man Ray’s assistant, she begins to fear her own photography career is becoming secondary to Man Ray. It also becomes clear that their relationship was turning destructive. As the relationship grew, Ray became much more controlling, and his obsession with Miller becomes very concerning. For these reasons and many others, the love story in the book didn’t captivate me.

Scharer also includes short stories about Miller’s childhood. Miller experienced a very traumatic sexual assault when she was very young, by a trusted family member. This event, plus her parents’ reactions to the event, I believe, impacts the way Miller views most of her sexual encounters. I also felt like this experience influenced her relationship with Man Ray. Showing how these traumatic events hurt the victims for almost their entire lives.

Would I recommend the book?

Unfortunately, I didn’t really enjoy this book. I didn’t find myself connecting with the main character Lee Miller. I also felt there was no closure with this book’s ending, and I found myself wondering what the book was really about. Scharer also included information about Miller’s life during World War II and those events were never really connected to her current life or to her life in Paris. In the end, I wasn’t sure why they were even included. Also, I never felt like I understood why Miller was so obviously unhappy in her current life with her husband.

Overall I don’t think I would recommend this book to my peers but, if you disagree or have any additional comments comment below!


Where the Crawdads Sing- My Book Review

By: Delia Owens

“Autumn leaves don’t fall; they fly.  They take their time and wander on this, their only chance to soar.”

Let me begin by saying I absolutely loved this book, I was attached to the story from the very beginning!

What was this story about…

Where the Crowdads Sing revolves around a young girl named Kya, who lived in the marshes of North Carolina. These marshes are close to a small town called Barkley Cove.  We are introduced to Kya as a young girl, and we follow her through her life.  Her family moved to the marshes during the 1940s; there were 5 children in the family, Kya is the youngest.  Quite early on, we learn about how abusive her father is to her mother and the children.  One by one, each family member decides to leave home.  Kya is too young to remember much about the oldest three siblings; they go when she is very young.  Eventually, Kya’s mother leaves; we understand that this is not the first time her mother has left, which gives Kya the hope that her mother will return.  However, there is something different this time that brings Kya this horrible feeling that her mother won’t be coming home.  The closest relationship Kya seems to have is with her brother, Jodie.  He tries to bring some normalness into her life.  Eventually, though, Jodie also cannot stay and live with their father anymore.  He apologizes to Kya and then also leaves her. She has now become accustomed to people leaving her.

Now that her brother has left, Kya lives alone with her dad in the marsh.  However, her father isn’t really around, anytime he leaves he leaves for multiple days at a time. Kya’s father hasn’t abused her like he did the other children, and for a short time, after everyone has left, he starts to be quite nice to Kya.  Eventually, this friendliness ends, and then he too leaves her for good.  During this time, Kya is also being sought after by the local school.  She legally must attend school; therefore, the principal is coming to find her.  Kya decides to go with the principal and spends one day at the school.  This day does not go well; she is starred at by her peers; she doesn’t have proper clothes or shoes and already feels intellectually behind the other kids.  After that day, every time the principal came to find her, she would hide.  Kya knows the marsh better than anyone; therefore, finding her was impossible.  Eventually, the school stopped trying. From a very young age Kya learned to take care of herself in the marsh, the only place she felt safe.

Once Kya’s father leaves the marsh, Kya becomes better acquainted to one of his fathers friends, a black man named Jumpin. Jumpin lives on the water and Kya takes her fathers boat to him to get supplies and food. He becomes like a father figure to Kya. Jumpin’s wife, Mabel, also cares for Kya and tries to help her by providing her with donated clothes and food.  This book is set in the 1950s and 60s, and therefore, segregation is widespread, including in Barkley Cove.  The black community cares for Kya much more than any of the white people in the town.  The white community treat her like a leper who is to be avoided at all costs.  No one thinks about caring for this little girl; instead, they isolate her even more. 

As Kya gets older, she begins to wonder about the other teenagers in the town; she specifically notices her interest in the boys.  There are two love interests that Kya gets involved with.  Both are offering her very different versions of love and care.  It is from one of these experiences that the community turns on her, accusing her of murder with very little evidence. 

My thoughts…

I really enjoyed reading this story.  It was a very different story about a small part of American history that I know almost nothing about.  The story made me curious to learn more about the marshes of North Carolina.  I learned that these marshes have a deep history of providing isolation and safety to different groups of people throughout American history, beginning with freed or escaped slaves.  They built homes and communities in the marshes.  The marshes grew in popularity again during the Great Depression and after the War by white families who had lost everything, which is where Kya’s family fits.  It was interesting learning about this time in history; I always like when a book brings me into another part of the past. 

The characters in this book represented so many different types of interesting people.  Each one playing a crucial role in Kya’s story.  Kya’s two love interests were extraordinarily different, and understanding how Kya’s relationship with each man forms and grows reminds us of how complicated love can be, especially when you feel alone in the world.   The people who live in town talk negatively about Kya, further isolating her from her love interests.   It is unfortunate to see how this community treats Kya from such a young girl and onwards, for no other reason than she was different from everyone else. The horrible manner of this community comes to fruition during the murder trial Kya is dragged into.  

I enjoyed learning about the black community, specifically Jumpin and Mable, and seeing their love for Kya.  It is clear they have a good understanding of how Kya may feel, and they know they don’t want to cause the same hurt to Kya that the people of Barkley Cove cause the black community.   This is more clearly seen during Kya’s trial, where Jumpin and Mabel attend in support of Kya. There was a very powerful moment in the story when Jumpin and Mabel come and sit in the assumed “white” sections of the courtroom and no one stops them.

It is also clear that Owens has a biology background in the way she describes the nature surrounding Kya.  It is incredibly descriptive and clear; you can picture everything she is saying and imagine how Kya fits into that world.  I must admit, at times, it did become tiring reading about all the specifics of the marshlands, however, I understand its importance to the story.   I also found it fascinating to see Kya’s resiliency living in the marsh and how she grows to become one with nature.

The second half of the book was difficult to read.  Although this was not a true story, the reader knows the prejudice discussed in the story did actually occurred for many groups of people.  People are always fearful of the unknown and Delia Owens does a great job at showing this to her readers in Where the Crawdads Sing

The Author:

“Delia Owens is the co-author of three internationally bestselling nonfiction books about her life as a wildlife scientist in Africa—Cry of the Kalahari, The Eye of the Elephant, and Secrets of the Savanna. She has won the John Burroughs Award for Nature Writing and has been published in Nature, The African Journal of Ecology, and International Wildlife, among many others. She currently lives in Idaho, where she continues her support for the people and wildlife of Zambia. Where the Crawdads Sing is her first novel.” – Good Reads Delia Owens Description

Have you read this book? Or any other Delia Owens books?